bulwell East midlands’ lowest incomes

File photo dated 11/06/13 of a general view of notes and coins as parents face a growing struggle as the cost of bringing up a child has risen to �148,000, research found. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday August 19, 2013. The Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) said that the cost of raising a child to the age of 18 has gone up by 4% over the last year. But the value of benefits for families and children only rose by 1%, and child benefit did not rise at all, tightening the squeeze on living standards. At the same time minimum wages rose 1.8% and average earnings by 1.5%, making it harder for parents to provide a decent standard of living for their families. See PA story SOCIAL Poverty. Photo credit should read: Rui Vieira/PA Wire
File photo dated 11/06/13 of a general view of notes and coins as parents face a growing struggle as the cost of bringing up a child has risen to �148,000, research found. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday August 19, 2013. The Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) said that the cost of raising a child to the age of 18 has gone up by 4% over the last year. But the value of benefits for families and children only rose by 1%, and child benefit did not rise at all, tightening the squeeze on living standards. At the same time minimum wages rose 1.8% and average earnings by 1.5%, making it harder for parents to provide a decent standard of living for their families. See PA story SOCIAL Poverty. Photo credit should read: Rui Vieira/PA Wire

Nottingham North has been named as the lowest earning constituency in the East Midlands.

Government figures show the average income for all adults is £16,600, with the figures including the self-employed and pensioners, which is £3,300 lower than the national average. In Nottingham South stands at £18,900, it is £17,900 in Nottingham East and in Rushcliffe it is £25,600, £5,700 higher than the national average.