Conservation project to protect endangered creatures

MEET THE TEAM -- Coun Mick Murphy (Con), of Hucknall (right), introduces the new conservation team at Dob Park. They are (from left): biodiversity officer Chris Jackson, volunteers Mark Oliver, Simon Pullman, Peter Searcy and David Fowler and countryside officer Lee Scudder --DISPIC 11-0664-4
MEET THE TEAM -- Coun Mick Murphy (Con), of Hucknall (right), introduces the new conservation team at Dob Park. They are (from left): biodiversity officer Chris Jackson, volunteers Mark Oliver, Simon Pullman, Peter Searcy and David Fowler and countryside officer Lee Scudder --DISPIC 11-0664-4

A NEW home has been created for protected creatures at the heart of one of Hucknall’s most cherished open spaces.

Dob Park, off Washdyke Lane, was the first woodland to be planted as part of the celebrated Greenwood Community Forest 20 years ago.

Dobb Park river

Dobb Park river

The River Leen flows through the site, which is one of the jewels in the crown of Notts County Council’s ‘Green Estate’.

Now £8,000 has been spent on creating three new ponds and watercourses. It is hoped these will provide the perfect habitats for endangered water voles and white-clawed crayfish.

Funding has come from the Local Improvement Scheme (LIS) in a project that has been carried out by Nottinghamshire Biodiversity Action Group (NBAG).

Coun Mick Murphy, a Hucknall Conservative member of the county council, paid a visit to Dob Park to see the work that has been done.

He said: “I’m delighted that the Local Improvement Scheme continues to fund projects like this. This area is a rich source of wildlife, and the new habitat will help protect a number of species for years to come.”

A smaller project to create a pond for crayfish, water voles and other wildlife has been carried out at The Ranges — the former Linby Colliery pit-tip on the border of Hucknall and Linby.

The LIS has also funded 5,000 leaflets on crayfish in Nottinghamshire in a bid to protect the animal and hopefully encourage the safeguarding of its habitat.

Chris Jackson, of NBAG, said: “This sort of work is vital if we are to protect these creatures for future generations.”