Death-crash tragedy inspires decade of lifesaving fundraising

LIFESAVER -- Janette Poyser (left) hands over two of three defibrillators to Roger Watson, of the East Midlands Ambulance Service, in memory of her son, Paul Basford. Also pictured are (from left) Paul's aunt, Elaine Morley, Janette's husband, Glen, and Alan Marwood, also of the ambulance service -- DISPIC NHUD11-2760-1
LIFESAVER -- Janette Poyser (left) hands over two of three defibrillators to Roger Watson, of the East Midlands Ambulance Service, in memory of her son, Paul Basford. Also pictured are (from left) Paul's aunt, Elaine Morley, Janette's husband, Glen, and Alan Marwood, also of the ambulance service -- DISPIC NHUD11-2760-1

A TRAGIC road-accident in which a Bulwell couple died has inspired a decade of fundraising by a Hucknall family that will ultimately save lives in their honour.

Motorbiker Paul Basford (32) was killed instantly in the smash on the A453 road near Barton-in-Fabis, Nottinghamshire in September 2001.

His financee, Tina Artingstall (also 32), who was a pillion passenger on the bike, died from her injuries in hospital eight days later. The couple lived on Bancroft Street.

Their deaths had a devastating effect on their families and friends. But the reaction of Paul’s mother, Janette Poyser, of Hucknall, with the help of a team of volunteers, has been nothing short of inspiring.

For they set about raising thousands of pounds in Paul and Tina’s honour.

Now the cash has bought a total of four defibrillators for the East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS).

The pieces of equipment, which are used to shock patients whose hearts have stopped, will be carried in fast-response vehicles based at Hucknall ambulance station off the Annesley Road end of Hucknall bypass.

The main event that has earned the charity cash is an annual garden fete, which is held at Janette’s home on Watnall Road and is promoted by the Dispatch. This year’s renewal collected more than £1,000.

Janette, her husband, Glen Poyser, who is Paul’s stepfather, and Paul’s aunt, Elaine Morley, visited the ambulance station last week when they were thanked by staff for their efforts and shown the three latest defibrillators bought with their donations.

“It was a bitter-sweet thing,” said Janette. “Just like Paul, we are a bit laid back. We didn’t want any fuss and all we used to do was write the cheques and send them in.

“But it was nice to visit the station and see what the money was being spent on.”

So far, Mrs Poyser and her family’s events have raised approaching £9,000. The collecting started when the family asked for donations instead of flowers at Paul’s funeral. This raised £500 in aid of EMAS.

Janette added: “Ultimately, the defibrillators will save lives, which is what we all wanted. I didn’t think we would raise this much but the garden fete gets bigger and bigger each year.

“This is not an individual thing. Without the help of everyone and the support of those who come along, we wouldn’t be able to do what we do.”

When used, the defibrillators increase a patient’s chance of survival by 85%.

There was nothing EMAS could do for Paul, who was a painter and decorator. But ambulance staff say the help of his family will mean others have a better chance if they are caught in a serious accident.

Roger Watson, deputy clinical director of EMAS, said: “The family asked for something that would save lives, and there is nothing more useful than defibrillators.

“These are perfect. The first shock that patients get makes all the difference.”