Dispatch plea traces family of war hero

REUNITED -- three generations of the Stubbs family reunited with the war medal. Pictures are Paul Stubbs, his son, Kieran, and Paul's father, Charles -- DISPIC NHUD11-1946-3
REUNITED -- three generations of the Stubbs family reunited with the war medal. Pictures are Paul Stubbs, his son, Kieran, and Paul's father, Charles -- DISPIC NHUD11-1946-3
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A POIGNANT appeal launched by the Dispatch to trace surviving relatives of a Hucknall war hero has been successful.

Last month, the paper featured the story of Charles Sampson Stubbs, who was killed in France during World War One.

A service medal that belonged to Sampson was unearthed by Hucknall men Gary Wood and Coun Jim Grundy (Lab), of Ashfield District Council.

Coun Grundy enlisted the help of the Dispatch with a view to reuniting the family with the prize.

Thankfully, Paul Stubbs, of Avocet Close, came forward. Charles Sampson was Paul’s great uncle. Also still alive is 71-year-old Charles Edward Stubbs, of Logan Street, Bulwell, who is Paul’s father. Sampson was Charles’s uncle.

Paul (40), who is married to Allison (42), explained that members of his family had spoken about a relative who had died during the First World War but didn’t have a family.

Paul has also been given some details about his family tree that stretch back to as early as 1690.

The section featuring Charles Sampson is prominent.

Paul told the Dispatch: “I couldn’t believe it when we picked up the Dispatch and there was an article about a relative of mine.

“We always get the paper, but it was quite a shock to see something that is so personal to our family.”

Plans are in the pipeline to reunite the family permanently with the medal, which has captured the imagination of Paul and Allison’s nine-year-old son, Kieran, who goes to Leen Mills Primary School in Hucknall.

Charles Sampson enlisted in August 1914 and, after training, he landed in France on August 25 1915. He served as a driver with ‘D’ Battery, 104th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

But on August 4 1918, while bringing ammunition to the battery, he was hit by a large shell splinter. He died in the arms of one of his officers.