Council pledges to look into Hucknall’s pothole problems

VITAL EVIDENCE -- one of the pothole photos taken by Coun John Wilmott in his survey into the poor state of Hucknall's roads.
VITAL EVIDENCE -- one of the pothole photos taken by Coun John Wilmott in his survey into the poor state of Hucknall's roads.

The poor state of pothole-plagued roads in Hucknall is to be looked into by Notts County Council, says one of the town’s councillors.

Coun John Wilmott conducted a survey and came up with 140 photos from 25 affected areas of Hucknall where the uneven road surfaces were “abysmal and unacceptable”. Now he says he has won a promise from the council to investigate the problem spots.

“A lot of people have rung me up to say how pleased they were that someone is at last looking at this,” said Coun Wilmott, who represents the newly-formed Hucknall First Community Forum.

“We are putting pressure on the council and asking them to do something about it. The state of the streets in Hucknall is far below the standard we should expect.”

Residents of one street, Carlingford Road, launched a petition, which was presented to the council by Coun Wilmott, calling for the removal of potholes. He thanked Coun Kevin Greaves (Lab), a member of the council’s strategic planning and transport committee, for visiting Hucknall to inspect the roads.

Coun Greaves has disclosed that a grant of £77.9 million from the government has enabled the council to make 100,000 road repairs across the county in the last year. But Coun Wilmott pointed out that repairs in parts of Hucknall were “of differing quality”.

Meanwhile Coun Wilmott has presented another petition to the council from residents of Knoll Avenue in Hucknall over parking problems.

“There is not enough room for some residents to park outside their own homes,” he says. “So they are asking for a grassed area on the street to be resurfaced and turned into a parking bay.

“This grassed area was created to make the area look nice. But it isn’t doing anything, except collecting dog dirt. Residents are having to park their cars well away from their homes, so the possibility of vandalism is rife.”