Getting to grips with real medicine

Nick Insley from Classroom Medics takes year 9 pupils through the process of taking blood during a careers day at the National School in Hucknall on Tuesday.

Nick Insley from Classroom Medics takes year 9 pupils through the process of taking blood during a careers day at the National School in Hucknall on Tuesday.

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Students at a Hucknall school got to grips with real medical equipment during a unique science careers day.

Some 170 Year 9 students at National CofE Academy on Annersley Road, took part in the workshop by science education specialists, Classroom Medics,

They learned about the effects of various medical conditions so they could decide on suitable treatments.

Andy Topliss, head of design technology at National CofE, said: “Classroom Medics bring real-world experiences into the classroom and we booked them for our STEM Careers Day to give pupils the opportunity to try out an exciting range of practical medical activities. It’s the best way of learning and will also give them an excellent insight into possible careers in the world of medicine.”

The workshops also focused on the importance of leading a healthy, active lifestyle, and how this can combat obesity and diabetes - as well as helping the youngsters investigate careers available with the NHS and opportunities through science.

Classroom Medics founder, Tom Warrender, said: “We pack our workshops with things you can’t normally do in school and make sure there is an actual applied link to science and a career. We illustrate the many and varied careers in the burgeoning Healthcare Science sector that pupils won’t have heard of (there are over 40) and show them how they can get into these careers simply with A-C grades in Science, Maths and English – and not just A grades as is the popular misconception.”

Student activities on Tuesday 17th March included working with a life size patient simulator to diagnose different conditions, recording blood flow speed and imaging their carotid artery with an ultrasound scanner (to compare them with those affected by fatty diets). They also used an iPhone connected to an ophthalmoscope to take pictures of the blood vessels in the retina and using a real needle to take fake blood.

They practised helping Eddy the Head to breathe and wore different pathology goggles to experience what it is like to have cataracts, glaucoma and partial blindness.