Headstock hits high note

HAPPY HEADSTOCKERS! -- bride-to-be Sue Anderson on her hen party at the festival, with friends all dressed as butterflies -- DISPIC NMAC 11-2359-34
HAPPY HEADSTOCKERS! -- bride-to-be Sue Anderson on her hen party at the festival, with friends all dressed as butterflies -- DISPIC NMAC 11-2359-34

THE LIGHTNING Seeds might have taken centre stage. But it was the second annual Headstock festival that went down the biggest storm as thousands of festival-goers flocked to Newstead.

Music-lovers from around the country pitched their tents to revel in three days of music, workshops, food and attractions at the newly-created Newstead and Annesley Country Park.

The Lightning Seeds headlined on Sunday, and the star attractions on the Saturday were 1980s post-punk band Echo And The Bunnymen.

But dozens of bands, DJs and live performers wowed the crowds for an event organisers hailed a massive success — despite torrential rain on the Saturday evening.

Other acts included Nick Harper, the Herbaliser Band. African Head Charge, former ‘Red Dwarf’ actor Craig Charles, who put on a DJ set, the village’s very own Newstead Brass and many more.

The Welfare Stage played host to BBC Introducing, which showcased some of the best up-and-coming talent from around the East Midlands, and there was a host of musical genres represented, including electro-swing, hip-hop, breaks, experimental and indie.

Run by volunteers, the not-for profit event was organised by Newstead Enterprise, which aims to breathe new life into the village through regeneration.

Newstead Enterprise was given a £433,140 grant from the Big Lottery Fund in partnership with the BBC, and was at the centre of a TV programme called Village SOS. The cash has helped to launch Headstock and create the country park.

One of the Headstock organisers, Mick Leivers, said: “We were really pleased with how it all went. Everyone enjoyed it. Some people said it was the best festival they had been to this year.

“The most important thing is there were lots of people making an effort. If you have that many people caring about something, it creates a nice mood.”

The festival went from just one day last year to three this time round. It aims to become one of the biggest music events in the country.