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Cervical Cancer Week in Mansfield and Ashfield

General Health tile

General Health tile

 

Health professionals in Mansfield and Ashfield are encouraging local women to attend their cervical screening appointments when they are invited to do so.

This week is Cervical Cancer Prevention Week and medics say there has been a noticeable decline in uptake by younger women aged 25-34 for the tests in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

Attending regular cervical screening appointments (also known as smear tests) is the best way to identify abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix at an early stage, which can help to prevent cancer before it happens.

The latest figures show that 79 per cent of 25 to 64 year olds in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire attended their latest cervical screening appointment. Although this meets the acceptable minimal standard of more than 75 per cent, experts involved in cervical screening say they would like to see more women take up the offer.

Screening and Immunisation Lead from NHS England Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, Linda Syson-Nibbs, said: “This simple procedure takes minutes to perform and it can save lives”.

“Women have the option to request that a female health professional perform the procedure and it is confidential”.

“Information leaflets are available in various languages and in alternative formats, visit the national cervical screening website for further information or arrange to see the practice nurse at your local doctor’s surgery.

“It is estimated that early detection and treatment can prevent up to 75% of cervical cancers. If abnormalities are detected at an early stage then treatment can reduce the risk of cervical cancer developing.”

Cervical screening is not a test for cancer; it is a test to check the health of the cells of the cervix. Most women’s test results show that everything is normal, but for around one in 20 women the test will show some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix. It is recommended that women who are between the ages of 25 and 49 are screened every three years, and women between the ages of 50 and 64 are screened every five years.

For more information, visit http://www.cancerscreening.nhs.uk/cervical/ Medics say there has been a decline in uptake by younger women aged 25-34, in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, so urging them to attend the first screening invitation is a priority.

Attending regular cervical screening appointments (also known as smear tests) is the best way to identify abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix at an early stage, which can help to prevent cancer before it happens.

The latest figures show that 79per cent of 25 to 64 year olds in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire attended their latest cervical screening appointment. Although this meets the acceptable minimal standard of more than 75 per cent, experts involved in cervical screening say they would like to see more women take up the offer.

Screening and Immunisation Lead from NHS England Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, Linda Syson-Nibbs, said: “This simple procedure takes minutes to perform and it can save lives”.

“Women have the option to request that a female health professional perform the procedure and it is confidential”.

“Information leaflets are available in various languages and in alternative formats, visit the national cervical screening website for further information or arrange to see the practice nurse at your local doctor’s surgery.

“It is estimated that early detection and treatment can prevent up to 75per cent of cervical cancers. If abnormalities are detected at an early stage then treatment can reduce the risk of cervical cancer developing.”

Cervical screening is not a test for cancer; it is a test to check the health of the cells of the cervix. Most women’s test results show that everything is normal, but for around one in 20 women the test will show some abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix. It is recommended that women who are between the ages of 25 and 49 are screened every three years, and women between the ages of 50 and 64 are screened every five years.

For more information, visit http://www.cancerscreening.nhs.uk/cervical/

 

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