DCSIMG

NPAC convoy to head to Ghana

A container full of school items and medical help is on its way to Ghana courtesy of North Yorkshire based charity, PhysioNet. The charity was set up by Peter Thompson, of Lower Dunsforth near Boroughbridge, in 2005 and has despatched aid to Africa, India, Europe and Fiji. Volunteers load the container on Saturday morning ready for delivery to the Lawra district of Ghana.picture mike cowling dec 14th 2013

A container full of school items and medical help is on its way to Ghana courtesy of North Yorkshire based charity, PhysioNet. The charity was set up by Peter Thompson, of Lower Dunsforth near Boroughbridge, in 2005 and has despatched aid to Africa, India, Europe and Fiji. Volunteers load the container on Saturday morning ready for delivery to the Lawra district of Ghana.picture mike cowling dec 14th 2013

 

An aid convoy organised by a Mansfield-based charity will set off on its five-week journey to Ghana next week, where it will deliver supplies to support education and policing.

It is the fifth container in the past five years to be sent to the West African country by National Police Aid Convoys (NPAC), and is destined for the Accra police headquarters.

The container has been orgainsed by Sarah Smithurst MBE, of Nottinghamshire Police Crimestoppers, and Mansfield Woodhouse community worker Richard Tempest-Mitchell.

Equipment from several police forces from around the UK has been donated to the convoy, following requests from Ghanian police.

The container also contains school resources including uniforms, books and 20 refurbished laptops, donated by the Computers4Africa charity.

Richard said: “Ghana is a fast-growing economy in West Africa and anything we can do to make a difference there is positive for the future of the country. As crime levels in Ghana are reduced, local British companies are moving there and are growing.”

NPAC have sent numerous aid containers over the past 20 years, including a delivery in December to the shanty town in South Africa where Nelson Mandela grew up.

The National Police Aid Convoys (NPAC) began its work in 1993 when a group of police officers used their influence, networks and negotiating skills to procure and then deliver huge amounts of humanitarian aid to refugee camps in Yugoslavia.

Local schools that want to get involved in NPAC collections and fundraising can contact Richard Tempest-Mitchell or Sarah Smithurst MBEat theBIG.village@yahoo.co.uk or via Nottinghamshire Police.

NPAC is open for donations of unwanted goods at it Crown Farm warehouse. NPAC can be contacted on enqs@npac.org.uk if local people wish to make a donation.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page