Operation by vet is world first

UNDER THE KNIFE -- the operation in progress -- DISPIC NHUD12-0424-11

UNDER THE KNIFE -- the operation in progress -- DISPIC NHUD12-0424-11

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A RENOWNED vet’s surgery in Hucknall has earned its place in the record books — as the first in the WORLD to perform a groundbreaking double operation.

The East Midlands Referral base on Nottingham Road is owned and run by well-known vet Graham Oliver, who is also the man behind the Buckley House surgery on West Street.

Vetenary surgeon Graham Oliver with Pippa and owner Karen Edwards, at the East Midlands Referrals  centre in Hucknall.

Vetenary surgeon Graham Oliver with Pippa and owner Karen Edwards, at the East Midlands Referrals centre in Hucknall.

It has earned a reputation for clinical excellence backed up by hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of investment in high-tech equipment.

Now Mr Oliver and his team have become the first to perform two hip replacements using intricate nano technology on the same pet.

The patient was 11-month-old terrier-type Affenpinscher, Pippa.

The surgery became necessary after owner Karen Edwards, who lives near Newark, noticed her beloved pet had gone lame and wasn’t putting all her weight on one of her back legs.

An inspection by Mrs Edwards’ own vet discovered hip displacia – a rare, hereditary condition in a dog of Pippa’s breed.

It needed specialist attention or Pippa was in danger of a life of pain or having to be put down, but in stepped Mr Oliver.

For he has been able to replace Pippa’s hips with new, artificial ones that are just millimetres in length.

“I am just so thankful we have a surgery that has the expertise on our doorstep,” said Mrs Edwards.

“This has given Pippa a new lease of life already and her recovery is going really well. Without this, Pippa could have been sentenced to a lifetime of difficulties.

“The actual hip only became available in that size a few weeks before the surgery.”

To complete the operations, Mr Oliver had to remove the head of Pippa’s femurs and drill down the bone, making sure not to cause damage. The spine of the new hip was then cemented in place with the metal head positioned very carefully.

The surgery on the second hip lasted an hour and 45 minutes and involved two vets and four nurses.

What follows is a recovery period laced with a full exercise regime.

It is the latest feather in the cap of the East Midlands Referral Clinic, which has been fully up and running for three years.

Mr Oliver has been carrying out hip replacements for up to 17 years and is one of the foremost surgeons in this area in the country