Raising a glass for the Green brewery

DOWN THE HATCH -- Anthony Hughes, director of Lincoln Green Brewery in Hucknall, set up the firm after finding himself out of work.

DOWN THE HATCH -- Anthony Hughes, director of Lincoln Green Brewery in Hucknall, set up the firm after finding himself out of work.

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WHY not raise a glass to Hucknall’s new micro-brewery, LINCOLN GREEN?

The business, on the Wigwam Lane Enterprise Park, has made a big impact since it opened just a few weeks ago.

It produces a range of traditional ales brewed ‘with Nottingham pride at heart’.

Lincoln Green was the colour of the dyed woollen cloth associated with the legend of Robin Hood.

The brewery has been launched by Anthony Hughes, who says: “For me, it was a decision to follow a dream.”

He points out: “It all came about as a result of finding myself out of work and not being able to discover the right new job for me to move into.

“I chose to set up where I am because a grant was available from Ashfield District Council and the unit for the brewery is very cost-effective.

“I am delighted with the very enthusiastic response since I first started the business. I have had a lot of support and encouragement from local residents and from the Campaign For Real Ale (CAMRA).

Lincoln Green supplies cask ale direct to pub outlets, as well as using the Society of Independent Brewers (SIBA) direct delivery scheme and wholesalers to reach a wider market.

The business places a strong emphasis on ‘heritage’ brewing and is a keen supporter of ‘green’ issues.

In keeping with its name, it produces four core beers associated with the legendary outlaw of Sherwood Forest.

Among those being brewed are Marion Pale Ale at 3.8% strength, Hood Best Bitter (4.2%), Scarlett Amber Ale (4.8%) and Tuck Porter Stout (4.7%).

In addition, Lincoln Green is planning to bring out seasonal brews and special editions that link to local and national events.

The business has aligned itself with a campaign to protest about above-inflation increases in beer duty which, it is claimed, are destroying the indigenous British pub industry.

The campaigners are very concerned that local pubs, which have always been the integral part of the fabric of British society, are being forced to close at the rate of about 30 a week and they say: “This cannot be allowed to continue.”