Roots put down for Big Friendly Garden

DIG THIS! -- Lea Fletcher and Wilson Chiziwa, members of the new Big Friendly Garden, which is to be set up for the community -- DISPIC NHUD12-0981-1
DIG THIS! -- Lea Fletcher and Wilson Chiziwa, members of the new Big Friendly Garden, which is to be set up for the community -- DISPIC NHUD12-0981-1

THE GROUND was laid for an ambitious new community garden in Bulwell when the town’s voluntary movers and shakers turned out for a networking event.

The Bulwell Forest Action Group (BFAG) invited local groups to ‘All Things Bright and Beautiful’ at the Cafe At The Crossroads at the United Reformed Church on Broomhill Road.

But one of the star attractions was a stand revealing plans for the Big Friendly Garden (BFG) that will be created on land behind Cantrell Road Primary School.

The site was formerly a playing field. Since being turned into a wildlife garden 20 years ago, it has been neglected. But now locals want to bring it back to life with raised beds, planting schemes, a sensory garden and allotments.

Bill Blackamore, secretary of BFAG, said: “It is a very exciting project and one that is for the community. It would be great to get as many people involved as possible.”

Visitors to the church also found out from NHS worker Ellyn Dryden about plans to set up a ‘Changemakers For Health’ group in the town.

This would be a voluntary group where locals were encouraged to educate other residents about healthy eating and exercise and raise awareness of treating illnesses, ranging from cancer to diabetes.

A presentation was given on plans for a £190,000 overhaul of Bulwell Forest, which includes a new children’s play area. This had been delayed but was now back on track.

Other attractions included performances from 85-year-old Bulwell crooner Ray Faircloth and Coun Nick McDonald (Lab), who is a Bulwell Forest member of Nottingham City Council and a top jazz pianist.

Mr Blackamore added: “A big part of the day was the community trying to take more responsibility for its own health. But it was also about letting people know they can make a difference.”