Transformed from dump to nature site

HELPING HAND -- Coun Jackie Morris (second from left) with volunteers and staff (from left) Kyle Heesom, Paul Chance, Lucy Kennedy and Ken Bates, at Springfield Corner
HELPING HAND -- Coun Jackie Morris (second from left) with volunteers and staff (from left) Kyle Heesom, Paul Chance, Lucy Kennedy and Ken Bates, at Springfield Corner
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THREE different green patches in the Dispatch district have been transformed and given Local Nature Reserve status.

Springfield Corner and adjacent Moorbridge Pond in Bulwell, Sandy Banks, historically know as The Hawthorns, in Bestwood, and Hucknall Road Walkway in Bulwell Forest are now protected and recognised for their ecological significance and value to the community.

All are well used on a daily basis by residents and visitors and, especially in the case of Hucknall Walkway, by commuters and cyclists.

The three sites form part of a joint project called Wildlife in the City between Nottingham City Council, Notts Wildlife Trust and local volunteers.

Sandy Banks was saved 30 years ago after it was earmarked to become a dual carriageway as part of a Nottingham ring road plan while more recently Springfield Corner was a small patch of wasteland and litter dump.

Volunteers cleared the site and transformed it into a wildlife haven.

Plans for the site continue with a two week programme of works, which started on Monday and will see a wildflower meadow planted and an old nature trail brought back to life.

Funding for the project comes from Access to Nature, a scheme run by Natural England and funded by the Big Lottery Fund.

“These are the first new Local Nature Reserves to be designated in Nottingham since 2004,” said Coun Dave Trimble (Lab), Nottingham City Council’s portfolio holder for leisure, culture and tourism. “This adds to Nottingham’s network of fascinating and diverse protected wildlife sites and brings the number of protected reserves within the city up to 11.

“The City Council plans to designate more important wildlife sites over the coming years to further protect the biodiversity within our city and their enjoyment and educational value for the community.

“It also realises our ambitions set out in the 2010-2020 Breathing Space strategy and the Ambitious for Wildlife Biodiversity Position Statement 2011-2020.”