War memorial rescued from basement

IN MEMORIAM -- the Lord Mayor (left) and the Rev Andy Nicolls at the re-dedication of the plaques -- DISPIC NHUD11-3159-1
IN MEMORIAM -- the Lord Mayor (left) and the Rev Andy Nicolls at the re-dedication of the plaques -- DISPIC NHUD11-3159-1

A STONE plaque featuring the names of Bulwell residents who gave their lives fighting in the Second World War has been given pride of place at a cemetery — after laying hidden in a cellar for years.

The memorial, which honours five names — R.S.Tatton, W.Brobson, H.Drury, F.E.Clarke and C.R.Wolley — is now proudly positioned on the chapel at Northern Cemetery on Hempshill Lane in the town.

Two supplementary stones offer thanks to those who fought in the Great War (First World War) and those who did battle during the Second World War.

But it is by sheer luck that the tablets were found at all. For they had been abandoned and left to degenerate in the basement of the now defunct Basford Social Club, which was previously based on Eland Street.

Thanks to the dedication and skill of a group of supporters, they have now been revived — alongside two memorials that feature the names of 174 local servicemen and women who served in the two World Wars and are now mounted at St Mary’s Church on Highbury Road, Bulwell.

To celebrate the re-dedication of the stone features at the cemetery, a service was led by the Rev Andy Nicolls, of St Mary’s.

Guest of honour was the Lord Mayor of Nottingham, Coun Mick Wildgust (Lab), who lives in Bulwell. He was also at the original church service to celebrate the restoration of the other plaques.

Members of the fledgling Bulwell branch of the Royal British Legion and family members of servicemen and women were also on hand.

Mr Nicolls said he was proud to take charge of the re-dedication service.

He added: “Sadly a stone tablet with names of those who died in the First World War didn’t survive.

“But it is only right the other is placed in such a priominent position. It was quite a poignant service.

“Obviously you do not want to think that the names of people who gave their lives in service of their country have been left in a cellar and forgotten about.

“It is a poignant reminder of the cost of war.”