Scottish health chiefs learn lessons from Ashfield

Scottish health chiefs learned about end-of-life care on a visit to Ashfield.

Staff from NHS Highland met care workers from across Mansfield, Ashfield and Newark & Sherwood to hear about caring for dying patients and those who frequent casualty departments repeatedly – high-intensity service users.

Care workers from across Mansfield, Ashfield, Newark & Sherwood welcomed visitors from NHS Highland to Ashfield to share learning on caring for dying patients and those who frequent A&E repeatedly.

Care workers from across Mansfield, Ashfield, Newark & Sherwood welcomed visitors from NHS Highland to Ashfield to share learning on caring for dying patients and those who frequent A&E repeatedly.

The visit was  hosted by John Eastwood Hospice in Sutton and the group was also taken to see the emergency department at the neighbouring King’s Mill Hospital and the Ashfield Health and Wellbeing Centre in Kirkby.

Iain Stewart, NHS Highland chief executive, one of those who made the trip, said: “This has been an extremely useful visit and I was interested to learn about how Nottinghamshire has integrated end-of-life care and how high-intensity service users’ journeys have evolved.

“It has been inspiring to hear how Mid Notts have tackled the challenges they have faced and there is much we can learn from their innovative approach.”

Kate Patience-Quate, NHS Highland deputy nurse director said: “It is encouraging to see such good work being done in Mid Notts and we will look to adopt elements of this approach within NHS Highland.”

Peter Wozencroft, Mid-Nottinghamshire intergrated care partnership director of integrated care, said: “The last two days have shown that from the Scottish Highlands to Sherwood Forest there are the same issues facing our communities.

“If we can share our learning, and learn from others, so that all the residents in our communities benefit, then we are happy and proud to do this.”