Suicide rates in Hucknall and Ashfield remain low as other districts see a rise

The number of suicides recorded in Ashfield in the last 10 years has dramatically fallen

Thursday, 25th November 2021, 2:42 pm

However, Nottinghamshire County Council is planning to further target suicide rates in the county overall as the numbers of people taking their own lives in some districts are on the rise, despite a range of preventative programmes.

Data given to the council’s health and wellbeing board shows suicide rates in Ashfield, Mansfield and Gedling have fallen in the last decade.

But numbers Newark & Sherwood and Bassetlaw are increasing.

Nottinghamshire County Council will continue to target reducing suicide rates across the county, despite falls in numbers in areas like Ashfield

A council report said that, between 2018 and 2020, there were 24 suicide deaths in Ashfield, 18 in Mansfield, 35 in Newark & Sherwood, 44 in Bassetlaw, 24 in Broxtowe, 23 in Rushcliffe and 20 in Gedling.

Councillors were told that the county’s integrated care system had been successful in securing a three-year programme on suicide prevention.

Plans include further suicide awareness training and targeted communications for students, older adults and those at risk of self-harm.

Dr Robyn Wight said: “In Nottinghamshire, we have lost 188 people to suicide in the last three years.

“Suicide has a significant, lasting and often devastating impact on individuals, friends, family and the wider community.

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“The suicide rates in Nottinghamshire as a whole have remained stable over the last 10 years.”

Catherine Pritchard, consultant in public health, told the board: “We know people who live in deprived areas are more at risk of suicide.”

The report given to councillors states certain groups are more at risk of suicide including men, people in the care of mental health services, people in contact with the criminal justice system, and children who have experienced abuse.

People who work as doctors, nurses, veterinary workers, farmers and agricultural workers are also more at risk.

The council’s Suicide Prevention Action Plan was refreshed and endorsed by councillors at the meeting.

The council report stated: “In Nottinghamshire, the latest data demonstrates average suicide rates from 2018-20 have reduced compared with 2017-19.

“The average suicide rate has reduced to 8.6 from 9.1 in Nottinghamshire.

"In Nottinghamshire, the number of suicide deaths has decreased to 188 between 2018 and 2020, compared with 199 between 2017 and 2019.”