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Campaigners fighting to save ‘most valued Green Belt land’ in Brinsley

Phil Oxley and cllr Meryl Topliss of the Brinsley steering group at their preferrred development site
Phil Oxley and cllr Meryl Topliss of the Brinsley steering group at their preferrred development site

Residents are fighting plans to build more than 100 houses on Green Belt land in Brinsley.

As part of the Broxtowe Local Plan, it has been proposed to build 110 houses on land off Church Lane, Brinsley, which campaigners say is among the “most-valued Green Belt land” in the village.

Meryl Topliss, chairman of the Brinsley Neighbourhood Plan Steering Group, said: “Members of the group are extremely disappointed by Broxtowe Borough Council’s decision to enter the Church Lane site into the Broxtowe Local Plan, for the development of 110 houses, which is against the wish of the majority of residents.

“The site is situated on a northern section of Church Lane, a stretch of beautiful landscape which runs the length of the village, defines the open character of the settlement and is a part of what Lawrence described as ‘the country of my heart’.”

The group has carried out a consultation to find alternatives sites and Cordy Lane has been identified as the most suitable.

Meryl said: “This site is of much less environmental value than the land on Church Lane, has no heritage connections and is situated in an already residential area.

“The Local Plan is now subject to an inspector’s inquiry where the final decision on sites will be made which will be attending and supporting the village’s choice of Cordy Lane.

“Anyone wishing to support our fight to save Church Lane can write to Brinsley Parish Council, Cordy Lane, Brinsley, Nottingham NG16 5BY or email theclerk@brinsleypc.org.”

A borough council spokesman said: “The Local Plan part two, including plans to build 110 houses on land just off Church Lane in Brinsley, was approved at full council on July 18.

“The Local Plan will shortly be submitted to the Secretary of State for examination in public, which means an inspector will examine the plan, in order to ensure that it is sound.

“As part of this process, the inspector may choose to hear the thoughts of the members of the steering group regarding the Plan.

“We look forward to receiving the inspector’s findings and are excited to adopt the plan in spring 2019.”