Students urged to consider nursing career with more than 150 positions available at Sherwood Forest Hospitals Trust

A-level students are being urged to go into careers in nursing as figures reveal more than 150 positions available at Sherwood Forest Hospitals Trust.
Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now

Ruth May, chief nursing officer for England, called on students going through clearing to sign up for the profession, as the NHS seeks to push it as a ‘strong career choice in uncertain times’.

The recruitment drive comes after the Government announced £172 million in funding to boost nursing apprenticeships to 2,000 a year.

NHS England figures show there were 158 nursing, midwifery and health visitor vacancies at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust at the end of March, the latest period for which data is available.

Sherwood Forest Hospitals Trust has more than 150 vacancies for nursesSherwood Forest Hospitals Trust has more than 150 vacancies for nurses
Sherwood Forest Hospitals Trust has more than 150 vacancies for nurses

Ms May said: “Uncertain times lie ahead, but one thing we can be sure of is that the country and the NHS will always need nurses, and that nursing will always offer a rewarding and varied career – making it a strong choice for any young people considering their options tomorrow.”

In a statement, NHS England said: “While levels of appreciation amongst the public are sky-high, the health service is calling on young adults – dubbed the ‘Covid generation’ – to not just clap for carers, but to become one.”

The Government said its £172 million package will deliver 50,000 more nurses by 2024-25.

Employers will get £8,300 per placement per year for both new and existing apprenticeships, which generally take four years and offer an alternative to university.

Mike Adams, the Royal College of Nursing’s director for England, said: “The investment is a welcome step but it falls short of the wider investment needed to educate enough registered nurses for the future.

“The full-time three-year nursing degree remains the best way to increase domestic nursing supply at the scale and pace needed.

“The Government must abolish self-funded tuition fees for all nursing students as well as introducing universal living maintenance grants that reflect actual student needs.”

Helga Pile, Unison’s deputy head of health added that a fair and consistent wage for nurses was also essential or the NHS would struggle to attract apprentices in the first place.”